It’s been a year since I started Tulsa Dances, and I want to take a moment to thank everyone — from around the corner and around the world — who has taken time to join me here. When I returned to Tulsa after several years absorbing and reviewing dance in New York, I wondered what in the world I would ever think, write, or experiment about here, dance-wise. Turns out I had no reason for concern. This blog began in part as a forum for my own thoughts on process and craft, but even more as a way to honor the work that’s being done here, in this city that has vastly more creativity bubbling under its surface than you might expect. It has been a joy to think and share and celebrate and dialogue with you this year. I love what’s happening in this small but vigorous community — the work, the play, the thoughtfulness, the grit, the harmonious collaborative spirit — and I hope we keep the conversation going for a long time to come.

I’m celebrating Tulsa Dances’ anniversary by finishing Where the Heart Beats (a gorgeous book about John Cage, Zen, and creativity, which includes wonderful details about his work with Merce Cunningham), then seeing “BorN” tonight, then running to Living Arts for whatever I can catch of Tulsa’s first PechaKucha, which features rapid-fire presentations by some of the city’s most interesting people, including Erin Turner, a visual artist who is a frequent dance collaborator, and Tulsa Modern Movement‘s Ari Christopher.

Keep it coming, Tulsa. I will, too. Thanks again to all y’all (as we say) for being here.

One example of the collaborative, innovative way that Tulsa dances. Tulsa Modern Movement performing “Remains” at the MOREcolor art exhibit opening, June 14, 2012. “Remains” is a collaboration between TuMM and Erin Turner for the site-specific eMerge Dance Festival, organized by Portico’s Jen Alden and the rest of the Living Arts Dance Committee, which includes members of every contemporary dance company in town.  (That’s yours truly in the middle.) Creativity without borders. Photo by Barry Lenard.

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